Tag Archives: stats

European social network usage

Earlier in the week, comScore released their latest figures on European social network usage, which Neville then kindly graphed in Excel for us all:

Graph showing percentage of each country’s internet population using social networks
Graph showing percentage of each country’s internet population using social networks

A pretty astounding chart that shows social media’s impact isn’t limited just to the US and the UK. comScore also released data for the Asia Pacific region on the same day – anyone fancy combining the 2 sets of data into one chart?

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Twitter’s UK traffic trebles in a month

Twitter's UK traffic trebles in January 2009

Compared to the graph covering the 12 months up until January, that’s astounding growth (as that itself was just a few weeks ago):

Twitter's UK traffic growth in 2008

To quote Hitwise’s Robin Goad:

Last week Twitter became one of the 100 most visited websites in the UK for the first time. It ranked 91st, placing above online heavyweights such as Expedia UK (96), Gumtree (100), easyJet (101), Digital Spy (103) and Money Supermarket (105).

 

However, the service is likely even more popular than our numbers imply, as we are only measuring traffic to the main Twitter website. If the people accessing their Twitter accounts via mobile phones and third party applications (such as Twitterrific, Twitterfeed and Tweetdeck) were included, the numbers would be even higher.

 

Now of course, you might think this was down to the Stephen Fry effect, but we couldn’t possibly comment.*

 

What will be interesting if Twitter really does go mainstream (which until today, I can’t say I really thought was going to happen), is that, unlike Facebook, Twitter seems to exhibit the same sort of power law relationships as blogs do. Which means the bigger it gets, the more effective work we’ll be able to do for our clients through it…

 

*disclosure: Stephen is a client of ours and we helped get him going on Twitter.

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Twitter grows 974% in the last 12 months

Following on from our recent compendium of social media traffic growth, Robin Goad has posted Hitwise’s latest stats about Twitter’s phenomenal growth in the UK:

Twitter's UK traffic growth

Twitter was one of the fastest growing websites in the UK last year, and it shows no signs of slowing down. If anything, the service is even more popular than our numbers imply, as we are only measuring traffic to the main Twitter website. If the people accessing their Twitter accounts via mobile phones and third party were included, the numbers would be even higher. Many people seem to find Twitter addictive: the average amount of time that people spend on Twitter.com has more than trebled from less than 10 minutes a year ago to half an hour now.

Twitter receives the largest amount of its traffic from the USA, but its penetration is greater in the UK market. For the week ending 17/10/09 twitter.com ranked as the 291st most visited website in the UK, accounting for 0.024% of all Internet visits; while in the USA it ranked 350th, picking up 0.020% of all Internet visits.

Twitter is still most popular with younger users in urban areas, but its appeal is broadening as it grows. The fastest growing age group of users is 35-44 year olds, who now account for 17.3% of UK visitors to twitter.com.

Twitter is becoming an important source of Internet traffic for many sites, and the amount of traffic it sends to other websites has increased 30-fold over the last 12 months.

This follows on from yesterday’s US Hitwise data from Heather Dougherty, pointing out that Twitter is now more popular than Digg.com:

Twitter's US traffic growth vs. Digg

While we’re on the subject, you could find out why people use Twitter, see Chris’ commentary on why the British tabloids are so hostile towards Twitter or even follow me on Twitter.

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Social media more popular than ever

An almost unbelievable couple of graphs from Robin Goad at Hitwise, the first showing that 10.09% of all UK internet visits last week were to ‘Social Networking and Forums’.

UK Social Media traffic Dec '07 - Dec '08

And the second showing Facebook’s inexorable growth.

UK Facebook traffic Dec '07 - Dec '08

There’s some more in depth data available in Hitwise’s UK Social Networking Update
from July this year, and it’s worth remembering these sort of growth
curves apply across social media, with this graph showing a similarly
stratospheric rise in UK blog traffic.

UK blog traffic May '05 - Jun '08

As Robin Goad said at the time:

over the last 3 years UK Internet traffic to out Blogs
and Personal Websites category has increased by 208%, compared to 70%
for News and Media. Another interesting fact is that the market share
of blogs is greater in the UK than the USA: 1.09% and 0.73%
respectively in May.

The trend also seems to apply even to Twitter

UK Twitter traffic Jul '07 - Jul '08

Again, a nice quote from Robin Goad:

UK Internet visits to Twitter have increased by 631%
over the last 12 months, with 485% of that growth coming this year.
Twitter is more popular with Brits than Americans: last week the site’s
share of UK Internet visits was 70% higher its share of visits in
America. Twitter cannot yet be considered mainstream in the USA, but in
the UK it’s getting there.

I’d also point out that the Twitter data above pre-dates the Stephen Fry effect (disclosure: Stephen is a client of We Are Social‘s and we helped him get going on Twitter).

Roll on 2009…

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Internet drives luxury goods sales

Latest research in from the IAB:

Of the premium luxury consumers, 72 per cent purchased goods as a result of seeing an internet advert, followed closely by magazines (70 per cent) and television (62 per cent), emphasising the need for further integration in luxury goods campaigns.

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Is online display advertising dead?

As a direct reposnse medium, perhaps. A recent study shows that:

Heavy clickers represent just 6% of the online population yet account for 50% of all display ad clicks. Heavy clickers are not representative of the general public.

This is backed up by…

other research from last year:

Ninety-nine percent of Web users do not click on ads on a monthly basis. Of the 1% that do, most only click once a month. Less than two tenths of one percent click more often. That tiny percentage makes up the vast majority of banner ad clicks.

So who are people clicking? Well, the most recent study says:

Heavy clickers skew towards Internet users between the ages of 25-44 and households with an income under $40,000. Heavy clickers behave very differently online than the typical Internet user, and while they spend four times more time online than non-clickers, their spending does not proportionately reflect this very heavy Internet usage. Heavy clickers are also relatively more likely to visit auctions, gambling, and career services sites – a markedly different surfing pattern than non-clickers.

And the one from last year:

Who are these “heavy clickers”? They are predominantly female, indexing at a rate almost double the male population. They are older. What kinds of content do they like to view when they are on the Web? Not surprisingly, they look at sweepstakes far more than any other kind of content. Yes, these are the same people that tend to open direct mail and love to talk to telemarketers.

It seems pretty conclusive to me (although bare in mind that this is US data). Combine this with banner blindness, and things don't look pretty for online dispay advertising, which is probably why it's getting cheaper and cheaper.

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Online PR is more important that offline PR

A wake up-call for the complacent PR industry:

Pollsters surveyed 1,000 people – Among those aged 15 to 44, it found that 45 per cent read online news on a daily basis. Only 38 per cent of this age group read nat­ional newspapers every day. The figures are the starkest warning yet to the industry that it can no longer afford to rely on traditional forms of media relations.

And it is not as if online PR wasn't important anyway

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Online video usage on the up

Mark Sweney:

The biggest winner, according to figures from Nielsen Online, has been Google-owned YouTube, which showed an 18% traffic surge in the two months since the writers' strike began in November, compared to September and October.

A separate US report, The Pew Internet and American Life Project, found that almost half of the US population that use the internet visited a video-sharing website such as YouTube in 2007. This is up from 33% in 2006.

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Consumers trust others’ opinions more than ads

Alex Burmaster, European internet analyst at Nielsen Online:

Six out of every ten of your potential consumers will trust the recommendation of someone they don't know when it comes to deciding which of your products or services to buy. They're more likely to trust these than your brand website, ads in magazines, on TV or radio or before movies, more than emails or texts they receive from you, sponsorships you engage in, or search engine ads or banner ads that you place. Brand association maps, which plot language, attributes and issues around a topic, show that, for advertising, attributes like 'false', 'deceptive' and 'misleading' are highly associated.

What people are saying about you can have more effect than all of your marketing activities, so it's vital to understand what's being said and the sentiment behind it – the 'buzz'. Our studies in the US have shown that monitoring buzz can be like a digital version of a crystal ball when it comes to sales. For example, a well-known pet-food manufacturer in the US was consistently cited in the same percentage of blogs until early March this year when suddenly its share of buzz increased 20-fold in just two weeks due to a contaminant scare.

This increase in negative buzz preceded by one week a drop in sales, and the buzz spike coincided with a 50% drop in sales. So while it's difficult to control what people are saying about you, by monitoring the buzz it can give you a fighting chance, a window, in which to develop appropriate counter-strategies.

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People trust other people, not ads (and especially not banners)

We're seeing numbers like this in most surveys that come out on the subject, but few surveys have the international reach and sample size of the Nielsen Global Consumer Study. The results show that while 78% of people trust offline Word of Mouth recommendations, and 61% trust online Word of Mouth opinions, only 56% trust TV ads and a pitiful 26% trust banner ads.

More in depth results below:

To what extent do you trust the following forms of advertising?

  1. Recommendations from consumers 78%
  2. Newspapers 63%
  3. Consumer opinions posted online 61%
  4. Brand websites 60%
  5. Television 56%
  6. Magazines 56%
  7. Radio 54%
  8. Brand sponsorships 49%
  9. Email I signed up for 49%
  10. Ads before movies 38%
  11. Search engine ads 34%
  12. Online banner ads 26%
  13. Text ads on mobile phones 18%

Although consumer recommendations are the most credible form of advertising among 78 percent of the study's respondents, Nielsen research found significant national and regional differences regarding this and other mediums. Word of mouth, for example, generates considerable levels of trust across much of Asia Pacific. Six of the top ten markets that rely most on "recommendations from consumers" are in this region, including Hong Kong (93%), Taiwan (91%) and Indonesia (89%). At the other end of the global spectrum, Europeans, generally, are least likely to trust what they hear from other consumers, particularly in Denmark (62%) and Italy (64%).

The reliability of consumer opinions posted online – which rated third, at 61 percent overall – also varies throughout the world, scoring highest in North America and Asia, at 66 and 62 percent respectively. Among individual markets, web-based opinions such as Blogs are most trusted in South Korea (81%) and Taiwan (76%), while scoring lowest, at 35 percent, in Finland.

Consumer Generated Media – such as Blogs – were considered a reliable source of information for North Americans and Asians

  • North America 66%
  • Asia Pacific 62%
  • Europe 59%
  • EEMEA 57%
  • Latam 53%
  • Global Average 61%

The original Nielsen press release, with more detail than above, is here.

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