Category Archives: Facebook

5 ways LinkedIn beats Facebook for B2B marketing

1400 x 425There appears to be a very ill-informed debate about whether LinkedIn or Facebook is better for B2B marketing. To me it’s a no brainer, LinkedIn wins every time. Why bother wasting time on facebook when it won’t work for you?

Here are five reasons LinkedIn beats Facebook for B2B marketing:

 

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It may be right. It may be good. But is it interesting?

Interest by Simon CunninghamDavid Ogilvy said this about advertising:

‘You can’t bore people into buying your product, you can only interest them into buying it.’

Here is the same mantra with the key word underlined by me:

‘You can’t bore people into buying your product, you can only interest them into buying it.’

As my advertising career began with Ogilvy, I have been interested in ‘interesting’ for a very long time.

In today’s world, is advertising interesting?

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Is Facebook’s ‘buy’ button the answer to marketers prayers?

facebook buy

Both Facebook and Twitter have recently announced separate e-commerce plays which will make it easier to shop online using their services. Facebook has declared they are testing a ‘buy’ button, while Twitter has acquired payment startup CardSpring.

It’s a step by both to help brands deliver a ‘last click’ which can only be a good thing as social media companies progress with their push towards improved monetisation. Nevertheless it’s come at a time when marketers are increasingly embracing social content on their digital properties and moving away from engaging with consumers inside a social network.

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Our ‘complicated’ relationship with Facebook continues

99 days of freedomAs the ‘Facebook is invading our lives’ saga continues, new backlash campaigns are springing up to react. A Dutch movement called ‘99 Days of Freedom’ is a counter experiment that looks at what the impact could be on our moods if we left the social network altogether.

Already in the last week, 26,015 people have joined in. The campaign encourages users to join the 99 days of freedom experiment, boasting that it only takes a few minutes to join, yet saves the average user 1,683 minutes – which totals up to well over 28 hours of freedom. The non-profit will contact users after 33, 66 and 99 days to monitor users’ moods. Read More »

#FacebookExperiment – was it all just a storm in a teacup?

tea cupAs the dust of the now infamous #FacebookExperiment begins to settle, we wonder what have we learnt? The experiment, which left some users renouncing their profiles and put the social media giant under investigation, has been described as everything from an important practice to an Orwellian nightmare – so let’s take a step back and look at the bigger picture.

For a week in 2012, Facebook conducted an experiment to analyse the site’s emotional impact on its users. A collective of researchers, in conjunction with Cornell University and The University of California, San Francisco, varied the tone of some 700,000 of its users’ newsfeeds to see whether reducing positive or negative content would emotionally affect users or alter posting behaviour. Read More »

Sharing Mom’s last days on Facebook

holding handsOften I’d walk over to my childhood friend’s large sprawling house at the edge of an American cul-de-sac on Long Island, and knock on the big, old door, getting an answer from my childhood friend’s grandmother.

Kim Sheridan-Dugmore’s grandmother, Muriel “Mom” Patricia (Sanchez) Ziegler was the matriarch of the place, a home for several generations. It was a home of fun, creativity and laughter, all fuel for Kim’s grandmother, who I remember never, ever, lost her patience, shouted, or made her extended family and guests feel uncomfortable. When I first met Mom in the 1970s I remember her smile and her beautiful big blue eyes, so when those same sparkling eyes appeared at me again, at age 98, from Kim’s status updates on Facebook, I took notice immediately. Read More »

How brands are generating revenue on social

mobile payment payments cashless contactlessConsumers are becoming ever more mobile and increasingly social. As brand advertisers strive to influence their purchase decisions on social media, how can they be sure they’re optimising their efforts?

We recently conducted a study* that sought to size UK consumers’ social media spend resulting from (paid) advertising and (earned) personal recommendations from their contacts. Overall, the study established that in the last 30 days, 14% of social media users had purchased something they initially came across on a social media platform – items that they would otherwise not have bought. Read More »

Is this the end of Facebook?

Facebookbuilding640The end for Facebook? Maybe the beginning of the end. Although tit has done a terrific job at making something so useful and addictive that people seem not to care if they forgo privacy. Or choice, it seems.

Its biggest problem is attracting youngsters who are increasingly going for ‘ephemeral’ social platforms like Snapchat where the emphasis is more on connecting with friends in a way that doesn’t leave an audit trail for Mum (or future employers) to find. People don’t seem to be put off Facebook by any ethical questions, more questions of their own convenience. Read More »

Facebook tops the table in the social World Cup

Facebook world cup pageA lot has been written about this World Cup so far. It’s the first truly digital tournament. It’s the one where second-screening has really come into its own. Above all, it’s the most social World Cup to date – one where our favourite networks have been much more integral to our viewing experience than ever before.

So far, so good. But drill down into behaviours in a little more detail and the extent of our “social dependency” is pretty striking. The top networks aren’t just major go-to points, they’ve become the first-choice destination during games. And, despite constant headlines about Facebook losing its appeal (and millions of users), our research shows that it still rules the roost in terms of our social conversations.
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Just who’s in charge here?

Facebookbuilding640The latest moral outrage to hit the internet centered on news this week that Facebook had been emotionally manipulating people via the news feed, denying them positive content to see if it made them sad, and vice versa. Angry tweets and blogs abounded, the digital equivalent of grabbing pitchforks and torches.

The crux of the argument was that the whole thing was a little bit creepy. You can serve ads targeted by behaviour, sure, but trying to make me happy or sad is apparently a step too far.

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