Author Archives: Tamara Littleton

CEO of social media management agency, eModeration (www.emoderation.com) and social media simulations company, Polpeo (http://www.polpeo.com/).

Can brands really use selfies as part of a campaign?

Ellen selfieSelfies have taken off in a big way. If there’s one thing #nomakeupselfie showed us, it’s that selfies can be used to campaign.

But the #nomakeupselfie campaign also highlighted the nature of selfies. They’re intensely personal. They provide a way for people to present themselves to the world.

It demonstrates why it can be so difficult for brands to use selfies as part of a campaign – it’s a medium that thrives on authenticity, and unless brands are careful, brand-created campaigns can feel contrived.

Read more on Can brands really use selfies as part of a campaign?…

Jelly for brands: is now the right time to join?

jelly logo biz stoneWith all the initial buzz surrounding the launch of Jelly, it can be easy to forget that the questions app isn’t even two months old. Co-founded by Twitter’s Biz Stone, Jelly was launched back in early January to tremendous hype.

Brands have already begun to play around with the platform, keen, perhaps, to ride the wave of the next big thing in social media. But are these brands doing the right thing, or are they alienating the audience they want to attract? Read more on Jelly for brands: is now the right time to join?…

The six ‘hot seat’ factors of a #SocialMediaCrisis

Screen Shot 2013-10-31 at 11.03.54The first time your team experiences a social media crisis can be traumatic. Bombarded with complaints, campaigning and sarcasm from all corners of the social web, teams can find their nerves shredded – crisis preparation a distant memory.

Read more on The six ‘hot seat’ factors of a #SocialMediaCrisis…

Why brands can’t afford to ignore social customer service

According to an NM Incite report, nearly three-quarters of customers would recommend a brand that gives them a ‘quick and effective’ response on social media.

Given this massive pay-off, brands are clamouring to get their social customer care in order – a Mashable post revealed that 80% of companies plan to use social media for customer service.

Read more on Why brands can’t afford to ignore social customer service…

Seven ways financial brands are using social media to communicate

Financial organisations have to operate under strict regulations, even on social media. The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA ), which replaced the FSA on 1st April, has made it clear that financial organisations have to communicate in a way that is clear, fair and not misleading, irrespective of the channel used. (April also saw American regulator, the SEC, issue fresh guidance permitting companies to post earnings and investment updates on social media channels.)

As more people turn to social media to communicate with companies, financial organisations such as banks, insurers and investment firms are finding creative ways to attract fans and followers, and engage them enough to keep them coming back for more. Read more on Seven ways financial brands are using social media to communicate…

How to extend the reach of live events with social media

The 2012 MTV Europe Music Awards was a true social media triumph. A live event is no longer just about being in the room or at the venue. With social media you can be part of an event taking place on the other side of the world. Below we take a look at how all kinds of events are being enhanced by social media, and the different platforms being used to boost engagement. Read more on How to extend the reach of live events with social media…

Building a branded online community: a long-term project

Brands often talk about their online communities, when what they mean is their branded Facebook, Google+ or LinkedIn page, or Twitter feed. All of these usually start as broadcast channels for brands – you’re incredibly lucky if your Facebook fans are all engaged enough to be considered a community from the outset – but, with time and effort, can become thriving communities.

Building a community starts with the fundamental principle of marketing: having a basic value proposition that your members believe in. If people feel they are part of something bigger – a group of people with a common interest, or part of a movement – they’ll work with you to help that community grow. Read more on Building a branded online community: a long-term project…

The seven elements of great fashion community management

The fashion industry and its fans have embraced visual social media sites like Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram, and blogging platform Tumblr.

It’s natural that social mediums that focus on (or include) images will attract designers, fans and brands.

But a real community takes time and skill to develop, and requires nurturing if it is to succeed, particularly in fashion. Fashion is such a personal, subjective thing that it can attract disproportionate levels of passion from fans, which can be wonderful if the passion is positive and the brand knows how to channel it.  Read more on The seven elements of great fashion community management…

The Olympics Guide: how brands can (and can not) get involved online

If your brand isn’t a sponsor of the Olympic Games, posting content that directly relates to the Olympics (either from the brand or retweeted from someone else) is a risky business.

The first rule of obeying the London Olympics Association Right (LOAR) is to not associate your brand and the Olympics. Any content you create and advertise must not mislead people into thinking there is any kind of official association. Read more on The Olympics Guide: how brands can (and can not) get involved online…

7 Benefits: Why financial service providers are taking to social media

Financial organisations have traditionally shied away from using social media to connect with customers. In such a regulated market, who could blames them?  And who’d want to ‘engage’ with their bank anyway?

As ever, things aren’t quite that simple. The under 24s prefer to sort their customer service issues out over social media, and research has shown that people want to interact with brands – including their banks, it would seem – on social networks. As a result, a number of banks and financial organisations have started to develop their social media presences to service this increasing demand for social interaction – and they can do this well within regulations. As we’ve seen with that resignation letter from Goldman Sachs, having no or little  social media presence yourself doesn’t stop your customers, employees and potential recruits using Facebook and Twitter to talk about you. Read more on 7 Benefits: Why financial service providers are taking to social media…