Author Archives: Arif Durrani

Arif Durrani has been a media specialist for the past two decades. His blog brings you news, gossip, analysis, and the occasional insight on all aspects of London’s media fraternity. He also provides wider comments on marketing in his Brand Republic leader here – http://www.brandrepublic.com/go/arif_durrani/

Guardian’s David Pemsel raises the most important point about newspaper paywalls

guardianWe’re lucky to live in such fascinating times. The way “digital” has thrown everything up in the air continues to amaze and inspire. But if the music business was the canary in the coal mine, the press industry was the next cart down the shaft. I was reminded of this today when yet another conference held yet another debate about the future of news; but this one particularly resonated. Read more on Guardian’s David Pemsel raises the most important point about newspaper paywalls…

Mobile UK more willing to pay for online content than ever

Traditional media owners are set to profit from multiscreen viewing and smartphone ownership if the right pricing models are adopted, is the rather heartening message from a KPMG study this month. In the advisory firm’s Media And Entertainment Barometer study, the decades old assumption that people have become too accustomed to free content online to start paying, is challenged. Read more on Mobile UK more willing to pay for online content than ever…

Facebook set for 40% lift as mobile takes off

The speed with which the social media giant has been able to adapt to the mobile space, and turn what many had rightly viewed as a threat to the business, into a new growth story has been impressive.

Agencies shoot down Sorrell’s take on Twitter

he belief of WPP’s chief executive Martin Sorrell that Twitter is more a PR medium for brands, rather than an advertising opportunity, has been widely shot down by rival agencies and social media practitioners

David Jones says social media is changing how brands do business

Social media is inextricably linked to corporate social responsibility and is creating a bigger transformation for businesses than the arrival of television, according Havas’ global chief executive David Jones.

In a candid interview on the back of the Starbucks tax furore, one of the world’s most influential ad men, and author of Who Cares Wins, was keen to stress how the likes of Twitter, Facebook and YouTube were fundamentally changing the rules of engagement for businesses today. Read more on David Jones says social media is changing how brands do business…

FT expected to be primarily a digital mobile product by 2016

The Financial Times, having spent the vast majority of the last 124 years as a printed business newspaper, will soon mainly be consumed on smartphones and tablets, according to digital leader Rob Grimshaw.

The managing director of FT.com called the shift to mobile “bigger in magnitude than the switch from print to desktop”, and added that the pace of change in consumption habits is happening faster. Read more on FT expected to be primarily a digital mobile product by 2016…

Newspaper print and web readerships at a glance

To help make sense of the second instalment of the NRS PADD findings for the period July 2011 to June 2012, and to analyse the impact for UK advertisers, media agency UM has created a great infographic

Condé Nast expects digital to generate 30% of total revenue in 2014

Luxury brands are arriving fashionably late to the digital ecosystem, and high-end publisher Condé Nast hopes they will propel digital spend to 30% of total revenues within the next 18 months, says digital leader Jamie Jouning.

Read more on Condé Nast expects digital to generate 30% of total revenue in 2014…

Love it or loathe it Mail Online is an undisputed success

The success of Mail Online’s lean digital operation, based primarily in the UK and US, could yet prove to be an industry inflection point.

Former Guardian leader predicts The Times paywall will evolve into freemium model

News International’s experiment with a non-penetrable paywall around websites for The Times and Sunday Times has been a failure, while the rise of Mail Online has been the “world success story”, according to former Guardian leader, Tim Brooks.